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Prine, Aldean top releases

Friday, April 13, 2018 – John Prine and Jason Aldean lead the pack of releases today.

Prine returns with his first album in 13 years, "The Tree of Forgiveness." Prine, who has overcome bouts with cancer, is known for his keen songwriting abilities. He receives help from the likes of Brandi Carlile, Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires. Hot shot producer Dave Cobb performed the chores here of a 10-song album recorded at RCA Studio A.

Aldean is out with "Rearview Town," his eighth studio release. "You Make It Easy" is the lead single, which was written in part by Tyler Hubbard and Brian Kelley of Florida Georgia Line, Morgan Wallen and Jordan Schmidt. The release contains 15 songs with Aldean not writing any of them. Miranda Lambert is featured on "Drowns in the Whiskey."

Veteran singer/songwriter Tim Easton pays homage to his guitar on "Paco and Melodic Polaroids ." Paco is his 30-year-old black Gibson J-45. Easton sings in a country blues style.

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CD reviews

The Tree of Forgiveness CD review - The Tree of Forgiveness
Mortality is very much on the mind of John Prine on this, his first album of all-new songs in 13 years. Understandably. After all, this is a man who has survived lung cancer and squamous cell cancer, the latter of which took a toll on his vocal cords. He's also had two knee replacements and a hip replacement. "All the TSA guys know me," jokes the legendary 71-year-old singer-songwriter. There are odes to the Almighty ("Boundless Love") and reflections on human limitations »»»
For Better, Or Worse CD review - For Better, Or Worse
With "For Better or Worse," John Prine follows up his "In Spite of Ourselves" album with more male/female duets. And this one is a true A-list effort, as it finds Prine trading lines with the likes of Miranda Lambert, Kacey Musgraves and Alison Krauss. Once again, though, Iris DeMent steals the show with the angry and sarcastic "Who's Gonna Take the Garbage Out," the same way she did with the prior album's title cut. She's a worthy sparring partner, »»»
Old Boots, New Dirt CD review - Old Boots, New Dirt
Arguing whether or not Jason Aldean's kinda (country) party is, in fact, anything remotely related to true country music is pointless. Aldean is so entrenched in the mainstream country marketplace now, we just need to accept him as he is, the same way we reluctantly accept Taylor Swift as "country." It's mighty tempting to subtitle a review of Aldean's new "Old Boots, New Dirt" release as 'Pickup Trucks & Pickup Lines,' as Aldean spends a little time »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Richey needn't chase any more – The opening lines of Kim Richey's "Chase Wild Horses," one of the best tracks on her excellent new CD, "Edgeland," starts with the lines: "I don't chase wild horses any more/I'm all done running from the way I was before Things I've done that I ain't proud of / I can't even stand the sound of I... »»»
Concert Review: Johnson, Mike & the Moonpies show traditional country is alive and well – Cody Johnson is not your typical mainstream country artist. He self-releases his albums, and instead of putting out rock and pop songs (disguised to look country), he records real, diehard Texas country music. And it was heartening to see and hear his loyal Los Angeles fanbase sing along with nearly ever song. His show tonight transformed this former... »»»
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Volunteer CD review - Volunteer
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The Tree of Forgiveness CD review - The Tree of Forgiveness
Mortality is very much on the mind of John Prine on this, his first album of all-new songs in 13 years. Understandably. After all, this is a man who has survived lung cancer and squamous cell cancer, the latter of which took a toll on his vocal cords. He's also had two knee replacements and a hip replacement. »»»
Paco and Melodic Polaroids CD review - Paco and Melodic Polaroids
Paco is the name of Tim Easton's Gibson J-45, which he bought for $100 and a couple of trade-ins 30 years ago. The name was bestowed on the guitar in Paris by a Deadhead. It's been Easton's best traveling companion and songwriting aid. »»»