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Randy Rogers Band proves good songs, play go a long way

Paradise Rock Club, Boston, November 15, 2018

Reviewed by Jeffrey B. Remz

Randy Rogers Band has been at it for close to two decades now. The Texas group has been on a few major labels sandwiched by time on the indie route. RRB has had seven songs chart, but none of them were particular hits. Rogers is one of those guys who could have stayed within the confines of the Lone Star state and made that a career, but to his credit, he goes far and wide.

Good thing because Rogers and his highly proficient backing band showed that you it doesn't take a hit or two to make for a great night of Texas country music. That means there was going to be a lot of guitar and fiddle. Instead, it's the case where the sum of the parts tastes even better.

That may not be easy given the lead-off song "This Time Around" was one of RRB's strongest songs to begin with. The drums were a bit too prominent, but the fast-paced song proved to be an excellent table setter for what was to come for almost two hours.

The charming "Fuzzy" was a departure musically for Rogers. The crowd pleaser was on the funky side, maybe so different that it was welcome from the typical Rogers sound.

While Rogers confidently put the songs across, he has never been one of those pretty boys that you tend to see out of Nashville. He has to rely on song and band.

As for the latter, yet again his group was a vibrant tour de force. Fiddle player Brady Black was a mainstay as usual, coming to the front of the stage, putting his full body into his small instrument to add fire to the songs ("In My Arms Instead").

There's always been a lot to like about the Randy Rogers Band. Still plying his trade, Rogers is living proof that good songs and playing go a long long way.

Parker McCollum opened with an enjoyable set. The Texan acquitted himself with his singing skills and a strong set of songs ("Hell of a Year"). Always worthwhile to see artists on the upswing, McCollum didn't quite cut the swath of Rogers, but McCollum certainly bears watching.