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Low key works just fine for Cobb

Great Scott, Boston, April 7, 2018

Reviewed by Jeffrey B. Remz

Brent Cobb is another in those line of artists who don't have a hit to propel themselves to the public limelight. What Cobb was have was a steady diet of touring and a plethora of quality songs to do the job.

And that's what the Georgian was all about with his blend of country, Southern rock, swamp rock and soulful rock. Maybe even a bit more.

He's got a down home drawl with which he sings and talks. Following in the footsteps of Chris Stapleton in that regard (he has opened shows for Stapleton in the past and is doing so again this summer. Next time he comes to the area, he will be playing before a crowd about 100 times larger), this is not a show built on ego.

Far from it. Cobb was a low-key performer, emphasizing the singing and song. Produced by cousin Dave Cobb, who seems to turn everything to gold, Cobb let the songs ride, stretching them out.

It sure helped to have a band that was more than worthy, especially guitarist Mike Harris, who simply was stellar on slide guitar. Harris gave the sonics a steely or swampy sheen, sometimes country. Basically, whatever was required.

Cobb offered up some new material including his brand new single, "King of Alabama," an ode to late musician Wayne Mills, who was murdered.

Cobb was the real deal. He didn't need to rely on any sort of hit or radio to make his case. As he did last summer at Newport Folk Festival, Cobb's honest delivery and songs do that for him just fine.

Savannah Conley, a Nashville-born and bred singer, opened with a winning half-hour set. Conley, who just released an EP, is the owner of a powerful, slightly husky set of chords and put them to good use. Conley, playing acoustic guitar, ended strong with "Midnight Train" where she took it up a bunch of notches. An impressive debut.