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Keith Anderson

C'mon! – 2008 (Columbia Nashville)

Reviewed by Michael Sudhalter

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Kickstart Country Standard Time to Nashville

CDs by Keith Anderson

When Keith Anderson arrived on the country music scene three years ago, his debut - "Three Chord Country and American Rock N' Roll" - fully described his style. The Oklahoma native hasn't changed a bit staying with the combination of hard-rocking country and sentimental ballads, but he's chosen a title that captures the energy of the album with "C' Mon!"

The title track picks up where the last album left off, but sometimes it's hard to figure out where its country sound is amidst those screaming vocals and loud guitars. Anderson is much stronger on the mid-tempo songs and ballads like "Break My Heart" where he challenges his girlfriend to do just that. Anderson co-wrote 10 of the 11 songs, including "Sunday Morning in America," one of the most interesting songs. The title and the opening lines may suggest that the song is a hybrid of country and contemporary Christian, but instead, it represents a cross section of American life on its day of rest.

Anderson also shines on "Somebody Needs A Hug," a bluesy rocker with cute lyrics like "you need to be wrapped up, snug as a bug in a rug, a big ole teddy bear squeeze where you can barely breathe, somebody needs a hug."

The singer spends plenty of time in both his own past, "She Could Have Been Mine" and "I Still Miss You" and those of relatives' - "Adaliene." The latter is one of the album's most creative songs where the narrator spots his uncle's tattoo, sparking a memory of the song's title character.

Fans of two country music duos will be pleased with Anderson's handling of the tunes that they made famous. He collaborates with Foster & Lloyd on their hit "Crazy Over You" and performs the version of the number one hit he wrote for Big & Rich, "Lost In This Moment." Anderson's version has more energy than the B&R version, and it sounds more authentic coming from its original source.