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Farr makes Opry debut

Thursday, April 26, 2012 – When Tyler Farr makes his debut The Grand Ole Opry on Saturday night, he will be stepping into the circle where some of his biggest influences have stood, including one of his biggest hero's George Jones.

"One of the most influential experiences in my life was the first time I went to the Opry," said Farr. "What made it so special was that I was backstage with my stepfather standing next to George Jones. As he sang 'He stopped loving her today', my arms filled with goosebumps. It was then that I knew The Grand Ole Opry was the heart and soul of country music."

Farr will perform his debut single, Hot Mess on the Opry stage.

"My mom married George Jones' lead guitar player when I was about 16," said Farr. "I started going on the road with them, and I got to hang out with my stepdad at sound check. During the show, I remember standing on the side of the stage and watching him sing, and that was the musical spark for me."

Farr sang his way through high school and went to college at Missouri State on a vocal performance scholarship. After two years in college, he packed up his car and headed to Nashville. He got a job at Tootsie's Orchid Lounge playing the 10 p.m.- 2 a.m. shift.

"It probably took five years off of my life," he laughed, "But doing that was the best thing for me. It taught me the art of entertaining and hosting a party."

From there, Farr took the party on the road playing clubs all across the southeast. He spent a year on the road with Colt Ford. "We've put a lot of miles on the van, and we probably qualify for a U-Haul endorsement," he said.

"What's great now is I'm finally getting to the point where people are starting to catch on and know my songs and that is the best feeling in the entire world when you get someone. Hot Mess is such a fun song and it's going over so well in the show and when I see someone singing along, then I'm happy. When a fan comes up to me after a show to say they had a good time, then I've done my job."

More news for Tyler Farr

CD reviews for Tyler Farr

Suffer in Peace CD review - Suffer in Peace
Sometimes, you have to start at the top before you can get real. Tyler Farr's 2013 debut, "Redneck Crazy," spawned two hits and landed in the Top Five. Colt Ford had him take ""Dirt Road Anthem" for a spin before Jason Aldean cut it. His sophomore effort, "Suffer in Silence," is more introspective. Producers Jim Catino and Julian King showcase an 11-song collection here (3 of which Farr had a hand in writing) that has a much different feel from the full »»»
Redneck Crazy CD review - Redneck Crazy
Tyler Farr has a hit on his hands with the title track, and like a good chunk of his debut, he seems far more content with being derivative instead of imaginative. Farr does little to separate himself from the pack, but how could he given that he goes for hip hop, rocks, raps and sings about rednecks and drinking? In other words, there's not a whole lot even remotely new or trailblazing. Farr comes from what is becoming long line of current country artists intent on meshing country with »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Newport Folk Fest retains its beauty – With acts ranging from Ray LaMontagne to The Staves to Case/Lang/Veirs, the Newport Folk Festival ran the gamut from tried and true to not so well known to brand new (sort of) acts. And that was the beauty of day one of the festival in enabling attendees to sample a wide range of music and genres, albeit little of it folk as we once knew it.... »»»
Concert Review: Hensley, Ickes have a good thing going – Chances are strong that Dobro master extraordinaire Rob Ickes has used the line a time or two when he explained his instrument of choice as "a guitar played incorrectly." The line got the requisite laughter from the small crowd of about 25 in the intimate club. His sidekick, Trey Hensley, didn't offer any such comment.... »»»
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