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Bentley returns Country & Cold Cans to U.S.

Monday, January 30, 2012 – Dierks Bentley announced today that he will bring his Country & Cold Cans Tour back to the U.S. this spring with 20 cities to be announced in the coming weeks. Republic Nashville's Eli Young Band will rejoin Bentley for the run, along with a combination of Will Hoge and The Cadillac Black in the opening slot.

The tour kicks off in Los Angeles on April 13 at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live with tickets for the first show going on sale Friday, Feb 10. Other dates and on-sales will roll out by market over the coming weeks.

"Country & Cold Cans was such a great tour last fall...it's just way too much fun to stop, and we knew we had to continue it into the spring and make another run across the U.S. when we get home from Canada and Australia. We're even going to Alaska...giving new meaning to cold cans," joked Bentley.

"I'm excited that EYB is coming out with us again...great dudes and they put on a killer show. I'm also a big fan of both The Cadillac Black and Will Hoge, so I'm looking forward to watching their sets every night."

Bentley is currently gearing up for the release of his sixth studio album "Home," on Feb. 7. The new album's second single and title track received an ACM nomination for Song Of The Year last week. The lead single, Am I The Only One, hit number one and went Gold.

Eli Young Band's Crazy Girl was certified Platinum with sales of more than 1.4 million downloads and was named Billboard's number one Country Song of The Year.

Nashville singer/songwriter Will Hoge's seventh studio album, "Number Seven," explores the struggles of the heart that are Hoge's songwriting stock in trade.

The Cadillac Black refer to their sound as "Country Fuzz," a mix of country and rock. Their debut album will be out in the spring of 2012, but has had six songs featured in TV shows prior to its release including FOX's "House," CW's "Hart of Dixie" and "Vampire Diaries."

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Riser CD review - Riser
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Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»
Feel That Fire CD review - Feel That Fire
Like it or not, music is a business. And when an artist as vital to the country world (so-called commercial country and beyond) as Dierks Bentley releases a new record, you can be sure that somewhere, someone in a suit is looking at graphs. So, in that unholy spirit, let's look at "Feel That Fire" in those terms. If it were a pie chart, it'd be dominated by two equally big old slices, one labeled Rockers and one labeled Ballads. The songs making up the former never fail to work »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Yes, Town Mountain is "really good" – Town Mountain exited the stage after concluding its regular set, and when the applause demanded the deserved encore, a fan yelled out "You guys are really good." That the mainly Asheville, N.C.-based bluegrass quintet demonstrated time and again. Town Mountain merged bluegrass and country sounds with enough alterations during the 81-minute... »»»
Concert Review: Philly Folk brings big tent approach – Each year, dozens of performers are booked to play the Philadelphia Folk Festival, but probably less than a quarter of them make it onto the main stage. Several smaller stages dot the grounds at which most performers (including the main stage headliners) can be found throughout the weekend doing workshops, "theme" sets with peers whose music... »»»
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