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Bentley returns Country & Cold Cans to U.S.

Monday, January 30, 2012 – Dierks Bentley announced today that he will bring his Country & Cold Cans Tour back to the U.S. this spring with 20 cities to be announced in the coming weeks. Republic Nashville's Eli Young Band will rejoin Bentley for the run, along with a combination of Will Hoge and The Cadillac Black in the opening slot.

The tour kicks off in Los Angeles on April 13 at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live with tickets for the first show going on sale Friday, Feb 10. Other dates and on-sales will roll out by market over the coming weeks.

"Country & Cold Cans was such a great tour last fall...it's just way too much fun to stop, and we knew we had to continue it into the spring and make another run across the U.S. when we get home from Canada and Australia. We're even going to Alaska...giving new meaning to cold cans," joked Bentley.

"I'm excited that EYB is coming out with us again...great dudes and they put on a killer show. I'm also a big fan of both The Cadillac Black and Will Hoge, so I'm looking forward to watching their sets every night."

Bentley is currently gearing up for the release of his sixth studio album "Home," on Feb. 7. The new album's second single and title track received an ACM nomination for Song Of The Year last week. The lead single, Am I The Only One, hit number one and went Gold.

Eli Young Band's Crazy Girl was certified Platinum with sales of more than 1.4 million downloads and was named Billboard's number one Country Song of The Year.

Nashville singer/songwriter Will Hoge's seventh studio album, "Number Seven," explores the struggles of the heart that are Hoge's songwriting stock in trade.

The Cadillac Black refer to their sound as "Country Fuzz," a mix of country and rock. Their debut album will be out in the spring of 2012, but has had six songs featured in TV shows prior to its release including FOX's "House," CW's "Hart of Dixie" and "Vampire Diaries."

More news for Dierks Bentley

CD reviews for Dierks Bentley

Black CD review - Black
Dierks Bentley seems intent on expanding his musical boundaries, but he may have overreached too much in eschewing where he came from. That most evident by the dominating textured beats. Producer Ross Copperman and Bentley seem hell bent on injecting odd meters and sounds, sharp detours from past efforts. Unfortunately, the atmospheric beats muddy up the vocal delivery on "Freedom," a song that stretches far too long at almost four minutes. Bentley also channels U2 with its »»»
Riser CD review - Riser
Change was in store for Dierks Bentley when it came to recording his seventh album, "Riser." On the personal front, he lost his father and added to his family, clearly affecting the subject matter of his latest. On the musical front, he traded long-time producer Brett Beavers, producer of every disc except "Up on the Ridge," for Ross Copperman, who has enjoyed more success as a writer, including several previous tracks for Bentley. Bentley embraces current trends in country »»»
Up on the Ridge CD review - Up on the Ridge
Dierks Bentley takes a left, turn, sort of, on his fifth studio disc. Bentley has built a solid reputation as a country artist with a slew of hits and catchy songs with edge. But here, Bentley goes bluegrass or at least 12 songs steeped in that sound. This is nothing new for Bentley, who previously has recorded bluegrass songs. Much to his credit, Bentley does not come off as a dilettante, but, instead, someone who feels comfortable with the music from the lead-off title track to the closing sad »»»
Editorial: Walking the talk – When names like Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Waylon and the Hag are invoked, you're talking hard core country. These are the touchstones of country , the guys who made country music what it was and still is (or maybe can be). When these folks would sing about being down-and-out and the rough-and-tumble, they knew of what they were singing about. Fast forward a few years to the country singers of today. »»»
Concert Review: Evans does one for the fans – The Downey Theatre is a relatively small community venue. Yet, when Sara Evans took its stage, she did so with such confidence and professionalism, you quickly forgot where you were. She gave this small, but loyal, audience an entertaining show that made you wish there were more there to witness it. Evans, who started her musical career extremely... »»»
Concert Review: The Cactus Blossoms move beyond Everlys – The Cactus Blossoms most obvious comparison is the Everly Brothers. Yes, Page Burkum and Jack Torrey are brothers, and they sure sounded like it. But only playing the Everlys card in describing The Cactus Blossoms would have sold them short. While the harmonies played a large role throughout, Torrey enjoyed a number of songs where he was the lead... »»»
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